Frequently Asked Questions

1. What kinds of legal cases does the Foundation usually take?
2. What does the Foundation mean by “acknowledgments of God” in the public square?
3. Why is it important that America acknowledges God?
4. Why is it important to post the Ten Commandments?
5. Does the Foundation defend religious freedom and other moral values in a different way than other religious liberties organizations?
6. What is an example of the Foundation’s approach to constitutional law?
7. Are contributions to the Foundation for Moral Law tax deductible?

1. What kinds of legal cases does the Foundation usually take?

The Foundation specializes in First Amendment constitutional law cases relating to public officials acknowledging God. The Foundation believes that a gaping void exists in this particular area where people should be standing up for truth; the Foundation can make a vital impact on our nation and people’s lives through enabling more and stronger acknowledgments of God in public.
The Foundation’s work also includes other vital moral issues of our day such as abortion, marriage, and gambling. To see examples of the legal issues the Foundation has worked on, go here


2. What does the Foundation mean by “acknowledgments of God” in the public square?

An acknowledgment of God is an action someone takes while in the public arena, i.e., on public property, holding public office, etc., that recognizes God’s sovereignty over the affairs of men. It could be offering a public prayer, erecting a display of the Ten Commandments, reading from the Bible, taking oaths “So Help Me God,” reciting “under God” in the Pledge of Allegiance, or similar actions that point the public toward the existence and importance of God in political, legal, and/or civil affairs.


3. Why is it important that America acknowledges God?

Acknowledgments of God in public are important because this nation was founded and its laws are predicated on a steadfast belief in God. Without that foundation the country will cease to operate as a free and prosperous nation able to serve as an aid and example to the rest of the world. The acknowledgment of God recognizes the source of our inalienable rights, to life, liberty, and property and the only proper source of our morality.


4. Why is it important to post the Ten Commandments?

The Ten Commandments are the succinct summary of God’s law given to humanity for righteous living. They represent God’s law, which is higher than any man-made law. Without a recognition of higher law there are no limits on man’s behavior. God and His law restrain both governments and the people governed. Posting the Ten Commandments reminds both the government and the governed of this higher law and, by implication, it reminds them of God.
The first table of the law—the first four commandments—are the duties humans owe to God and we should only be accountable to Him for keeping or breaking them. The second table of the law—the final six commandments—are the duties humans owe to each other and we may be held accountable by society in various ways for failures to keep them. This division is important for understanding the proper reach of government over people’s lives, especially as it pertains to their relationship with God.
Much of the law in America is based directly on the Ten Commandments themselves or principles derived therefrom. Thus, in order to understand the foundations of American law it is important to know the Ten Commandments. Reminding the nation of such true moral first principles helps rekindle the moral fabric of the nation and reminds citizens of their moral responsibilities.

5. Does the Foundation defend religious freedom and other moral values in a different way than other religious liberties organizations?

Yes. Unfortunately, most legal organizations today based their arguments on whatever the latest United States Supreme Court case says is the law. These cases rarely discuss the meaning of the words of the Constitution and even rarer still do they follow what the words say to decide the case before them. As a result, textual analysis has fallen out of favor in constitutional law despite the fact that the Constitution is still the governing law until it is properly amended by the process set forth in that document.
Like the Founding Fathers, the Foundation believes that in order to arrive at fair and truthful conclusions in constitutional cases, the text must be the standard for determining the outcome. Thus, even though it may not be the “popular” legal argument and even though some judges may reject it altogether, the Foundation stands to put the true meaning of Constitution before the judiciary and other lawyers in hopes that the understanding of the law may once again be restored to its rightful place as the right way to dispense constitutional justice.


6. What is an example of the Foundation’s approach to constitutional law?

In the Ten Commandments cases that were recently decided by the U.S. Supreme Court, other religious liberties organizations defended the display of the Ten Commandments by arguing that they are an important historic artifact, not a religious document. In order to make the Ten Commandments acceptable under Supreme Court precedent, these organizations diminished the religious importance of the Decalogue and denied that they are an acknowledgment of God’s sovereignty over the affairs of men.
The Foundation, on the other hand, argued in briefs filed in McCreary County, Ky. v. ACLU of Ky. and Van Orden v. Perry that these Ten Commandments displays were constitutional under the historic meaning of the First Amendment to acknowledge God’s superintending providence over this nation. Simply put, just because the Ten Commandments are religious does not mean that they are an “establishment of religion,” which is what the First Amendment prohibits. The Founders never intended to ban religious things from public view and we should not have to diminish God’s word by relegating it to mere history in order to show it in public.


7. Are contributions to the Foundation for Moral Law tax deductible?

Yes. The Foundation is a designated 501(c)(3) non-profit organization and as such all contributions are tax deductible.

 
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